The Pupil Premium and Catch-up Funding

The Pupil Premium (PP) is additional funding allocated to schools on top of the main funding that they receive.  This funding is targeted at students from disadvantaged backgrounds (eligible for Free School Meals or In Care) to ensure that they are able to benefit from the same opportunities as students from less deprived families.  The Pupil Premium exists because data suggests that students who have been eligible for Free School Meals at any point in their school career have consistently lower attainment than those who have never been eligible.

Since September 2014, the Pupil Premium is worth £935 and goes to students who at any point in the past six years have been in receipt of Free School Meals (FSM); £1900 goes to any student who has been continuously looked after for the past six months or who has been adopted from care under the Adoption and Children Act 2002 or who has left care under a Special Guardianship or Residence Order; finally £300 goes to students whose parent/parents are currently serving in the armed forces or are in receipt of a pension from the MoD.

How the Pupil Premium is spent is monitored closely with all schools accountable for the impact of the money spent.  At Ormiston Chadwick Academy our strategy is to utilise the funding support for our Pupil Premium students in the following areas:

  • Raising achievement and attainment
  • Improving attendance
  • Providing additional support and intervention for the most vulnerable students
  • Raising aspirations
  • Social and Cultural

We aim to maximise opportunities for all students – ‘every student is valued for who they are’ (IQM Quality Mark and Centre of Excellence 2015)

Numbers of Pupil Premium eligible students 17/18:

Year Group Male Female Total Total %
7 73 50%
8 51 34 85 58.6%
9 36 39 75 56.8%
10 29 31 60 50.4%
11 22 31 53 42.4%
Overall Total 346 52%

 

Projections for 17/18

In 2017/18 Ormiston Chadwick Academy will receive Pupil Premium funding of £323,510. Our current spending strategy for 17/18 is as follows:

Intervention Cost Rationale
Raising Achievement and Attainment  
2 additional Maths teachers £85,562 Students entering with depressed numeracy and literacy levels so require extra support in lessons, during ECM time and after school. Accelerated reader assists in improving reading ages
PP intervention equivalent to one teacher’s timetable £28,730
C Zone for vulnerable students £24,491
Leader of alternative provision £2250
Extra resources in English £6,500
Teaching Assistants in English and Maths £40,668
Accelerated Reading Programme £2,679
1:1 Maths tuition during May half term £720 Extra support for PP students to ensure that they are able to fully access the exam and can make at least expected progress
Saturday Academy and Holiday Study £9785
Mint Class  £250 Staff aware of who PP students are and the progress they are making
Innovation fund (bidding fund for departments for resources to raise the attainment of PP students) £28,959 To allow all departments to provide extra provision for PP students including revision guides and workbook s which they may not otherwise be able to purchase.
Improving Attendance Attendance of PP students is lower than non PP students and this is evident from Primary school. Home visits on first day of absence and attendance surgeries encourage improvements and are supportive
Attendance Officer  £23,216
Free Student Breakfast  £12,500
Additional Support and Intervention for most vulnerable
Free or subsidised uniform  £1,000 To ensure that all students look the same and no PP student is without a school uniform
Alternative provision (Harmonise, Horizons and Everton Academy) £20,000 To ensure that all students look the same and no PP student is without a school uniform
Raising Aspirations  
1:1 Careers Interview £7,500 Ensures that PP students are able to access the courses that best suit their career interests, while encouraging as many as possible to consider A levels.
Social and Cultural
Free music tuition and instruments £8,000  Opportunity for students to experience learning a musical instrument
Free or subsidised school trips £10,000 Access to all trips for all students so that cost does not become a factor prohibiting students attending cultural and social experiences
Enrichment £8,000 Students able to participate in activities which would otherwise not be open to them including horse riding and rock climbing. Also providing an extended school day until 4.00pm so that students can access homework club and over 100 other activities
Educational visit to a Russell Group university £2700 Access to all trips for all students so that cost does not become a factor prohibiting students from having aspirations to attend university
TOTAL £323,510

 

 Rationale for spending strategy:

Barrier: Students enter the Academy with depressed levels of literacy and numeracy.  This is increasing year on year.

As a result the Academy has taken the decision to focus a large percentage of the funding on Maths and English, providing dedicated PP intervention within and beyond the timetable.  Additional resources purchased include Accelerated Reader which is used in ‘literacy boost’ lessons to ensure that those with reading ages below their chronological age are given the opportunity to make rapid progress.  This is in conjunction with 1:1 reading sessions during ECM time. Mint Class enables teachers to easily identify PP in their seating plans and plan lessons accordingly to maximise gains for PP students.

Additional study opportunities at weekends and in holiday time enable those KS4 PP students who need extra intervention to access all subjects and enables gaps to be closed more rapidly.  Our innovation fund enables all subjects to access extra funding for PP students for use in a variety of ways whether it be buying their revision guides or for an innovative idea based on the pedagogical research undertaken through the CPD programme they wish to trial.

Barrier: The attendance of PP students is below non PP students.  This reduces their school hours and causes them to fall behind.

A dedicated attendance team focus on first day of absence phone calls and visits for PP students. Free breakfasts ensure that all PP students have had a meal at the start of the day to help aid focus and concentration.

Barrier: Some of our PP students require additional support or an alternative curriculum to meet their needs.

Alternative provision provides some students with an alternative to exclusion and allows them to access more external support agencies to help them develop the skills needed to re-enter mainstream education at the academy. The timetable has been costed and constructed so that many teachers have additional periods where they can provide flexibility for students that need to be re-timetabled to ensure their curriculum is fit for purpose and they are still getting an excellent entitlement if they come out of a subject.

Barrier: Many of our PP students have not had anyone in the family attend University so do not have the same level of knowledge at home to draw from when considering future options.

We ensure that all our PP have 1:1 careers advice and have been on at least one University trip whilst they are with us. We also invite all parents to attend a University trip with talks given on accessibility, finance etc. Work experience is personalised to each student and we ensure this is matched to their academic ability.

Barrier: Our PP students may not have had the same access to a wide range of enrichment activities as non PP. As an academy we firmly believe that access to enrichment is vital for all students’ social, moral, spiritual and cultural development.

Allocating funding to this means that no PP student is at a disadvantage due to the cost of a trip and can still access all the opportunities that the academy provides, whether it be a trip to the theatre or a trip to Kenya.

How will we measure the impact?

The strategy will be reviewed in August 2017.  The impact will be measured through:

  • GCSE Results 2018
  • Half termly attendance figures for PP students compared to non PP students
  • Data analysis every term including reading ages
  • Weekly RAP meetings
  • Student surveys/interviews
  • Breakfast club attendance tracking

 

What we expect as a result of our interventions

GCSE results –  For the gaps between PP and non PP to have decreased within English and Maths and for PP students to compare favourably with national rates of achievement.

Attendance – For PP students to achieve greater rates of attendance and narrowed the gap with national average. For there to be fewer PP who are persistently absent.

For PP students to have caught up with non PP peers with reading ages, that the vast majority to have a reading age equivalent to their age in years.
For no PP student to be out by more than a grade in any subject on predictions due to intensity of tracking.

When surveyed PP students have a good understanding of their choices of next steps and no PP student to leave the school without a college offer.
For no PP student to perform poorly on a day to day basis due to lack of nutrition.

Any student on alternative provision still attains a full suite of qualifications and has an offer of a college place.

HA PP students in KS3 also have targeted intervention in English and Maths during ECM time alongside G&T enrichment including coding club, debating club and art club with trips and materials related to any of these activities paid for, for these students.  Students are also given the opportunity to experience a Russell Group University with a visit to Cambridge for Science and Manchester University for Languages with travels and costs paid. There is a visit from an author every year and HA PP students experience a workshop with the author to improve their writing.

All HA PP students have interventions specifically tailored to their needs, enabling them to access Grade 8 and 9 in English and Maths and A/A* grades across other subjects.  These interventions take place during ECM time and as enrichment both after school, at Saturday academy and during school holidays.  There is also a planned residential in English and Maths.

HA PP students are given 1:1 careers advice specifically targeted at ensuring they are accessing appropriate A level courses which will enable them to progress to a Russell Group

University.  To guide them in their decisions they are also offered the opportunity to visit a Russell group University, including York, Liverpool and Cambridge.  Science students visited Cambridge to encourage them to pursue careers in the Sciences.  All visits are free of charge.

Year 10 HA PP students are also invited to attend a morning at Cronton College to experience lectures that they could expect should they decide to apply for Oxford University.

In 2016/17 Ormiston Chadwick Academy received Pupil Premium funding of £319,723.07

Pupil Premium Cost Analysis 16/17

Intervention Cost
Raising Achievement and Attainment  
2 additional Maths teachers £65, 401
Extra resources in English £23,597
Teaching Assistants in English and Maths £56,789
Accelerated Reading Programme £2,571
Staff CPD £2808
Tracking data and assessments £3127.28
1:1 Maths tuition during May half term £720
Saturday Academy and Holiday Study £9,785
Mint Class £250
Innovation fund (bidding fund for departments for resources to raise the attainment of PP students) £3,783
Ingredients for catering lessons £2271
Improving Attendance  
Attendance Officer £23,154
Home Visits £19,073
Free Student Breakfast £17,428
Additional Support and Intervention for most vulnerable  
Free or subsidised uniform £993
Alternative provision (Harmonise, Horizons and Everton Academy) £46,363
Leader of alternative provision £2250
Raising Aspirations  
1:1 Careers Interview £7,041
Social and Cultural  
Free music tuition and instruments £15,124
Free or subsidised school trips £13,529.16
Enrichment £4823
TOTAL £ 320,880.44

 

The Impact of Pupil Premium Funding

We evaluate the impact of our Pupil Premium strategy and funded activities in order to refine and reshape delivery to maximise impact.

Raising Achievement and Attainment

The performance of disadvantaged students has improved from 2014-2016.  The percentage of students achieving 5A*-C with English and Maths has increased by 23% and is now above national figures for all students.  Those achieving 5A*-C has increased by 32% from 2014-2016 and is also above national figures for all students, Basics shows an increase of 16% and is above national.

Expected Progress for disadvantaged students in English and Maths has increased by 28% and 18% respectively from 2014-2016.  English is now 18% above national figures for all students and Maths is only 2% behind national figures for all students.  In terms of comparisons with disadvantaged students nationally we are now above on every measure.

In school gaps are closing for all measures from 2014-2016.  The most notable are 5A*-C and Basics which have reduced by 18% and 16% respectively from 2015-2016.  5A*-C En/Ma has also reduced by 15% from 2015 – 2016.

Due to the change in government measures, 2017 results are not fully comparable to previous years.  Overall, disadvantaged students in Year 11 achieved a progress 8 score of 0.76 and 86% achieved a positive Progress 8 score.  This percentage has remained stable from the previous year and the progress 8 figure has increased by 0.08.

As you will see from the figure, a considerable amount of the funding was spent employing additional teachers and paying for additional support in Maths.  The impact of this was that Pupil Premium students achieved a progress 8 score of 0.13.

2 students achieved Grade 9 in Maths, 2 in English Language and 2 in English Literature.  One of our students achieved 3 Grade 9s across English, English Literature and Maths which only  2% of the country achieved.

Disadvantaged students in our current Year 11 have a progress 8 score of 0.42 and 74% have a positive progress 8 score. We expect this figure to rise throughout the year.

Improving Attendance

Attendance 16/17 as at 26th May 2017

Attendance Gaps PP and non PP % All Year 7 Year 8 Year 9 Year 10 Year 11
Gap 3.88 1.13 4.22 4.96 5.63 4.28

Attendance for PP students is on an upward trend from 89% in 2013/14 to 94.6% in 16/17

A free breakfast offer every day has also helped to improve punctuality across the school and ensures that PP students have the opportunity to have a meal at the start of the day.

Additional Support and Intervention for most vulnerable

Ormiston Chadwick Academy opened on 1st September 2014.  All Year 7 Pupil Premium students are provided with a new tie.  Equally, Year 11 Pupil Premium students are also presented with a tie to mark their last year of school.  In 2016/17 other items of uniform including blazers, shoes and PE kits were provided for individual PP students as required.

Alternative provision was necessary for some of our vulnerable Pupil Premium students at risk of permanent exclusion, to allow them to engage fully in education.  The alternative provision was a temporary measure to enable students to re engage with education.

Of those students who were provided with alternative provision in Year 11, 100% achieved positive progress 8 scores.

Raising Aspirations

At OCA we recognise the importance of careers advice.  All Pupil Premium students in Year 11 were given 1:1 careers advice and support with college visits and applications and 100% of students were made an offer of a college place compared to the LA average of 96.7%.   We are in contact with colleges in October and June to ensure that our students’ needs are still being met.

Social and Cultural

The academy enrichment days and school visits gave our Pupil Premium students the opportunity to engage in activities that would build their social experiences and provided opportunities that would not otherwise have been available to them, including 4 students travelling to Kenya as part of a charitable visit to assist in the building of schools and providing a better quality of life for children.

The Academy runs subsidised trips for PP students which play a large role in ensuring they receive the social and cultural education which may not otherwise have been provided.

Trips include visits to Cambridge University and Oxford University to raise students’ aspirations.

PP students were also given the opportunity to participate in The Brilliant Club.

Free music tuition also provides the opportunity for students to extend their cultural experiences.  They are offered the full range of instruments to choose from and are also offered the opportunity to gain music qualifications.

Literacy and Numeracy Catch-up Premium

The literacy and numeracy catch-up premium gives schools additional funding to support year 7 pupils who did not achieve the national standard of 100 in reading or maths at the end of key stage 2 (KS2).

The catch up funding is designed to ensure that students who have not achieved their potential at KS2 are not disadvantaged by this and are provided with the opportunity to ensure they have the same equality of opportunity as their peers by the time they leave compulsory education. The wider aims of the catch up funding include:-

  • To increase social mobility
  • To enable students from disadvantaged backgrounds to get to the top universities
  • To ensure that students from all backgrounds have an equal opportunity to be successful
  • To reduce the attainment gap between the highest and lowest achieving pupils nationally

 

Overview of the school and funding 2016-17
Total number of year 7 students on roll 152
Total number of students eligible for catch up funding 18
Total amount of funding received £18869

 

The strategies employed last year include:-
  • Dedicated Nurture Teacher (including dedicated nurture room) – the school has employed a dedicated nurture teacher (KS2/3 trained) to teach those students most in need of catch-up in literacy and numeracy in Yr 7 (and in Yr8). Students in this nurture set are taught in the same environment by the nurture teacher for all their English and Mathematics lessons (10/25), easing transition from primary to secondary.

 

  • Accelerated Reader– The school uses the Accelerated Reader programme to support the assessment and improvement of students’ reading age supporting their basic literacy skills. Additional books were purchased for our weakest readers to allow them to start accessing the scheme.

 

  • Small group literacy intervention group and 1:1 reading– Small groups or individual students are withdrawn from lessons to work on basic English skills with our English HLTA or TA, these groups focus particularly on writing skills such as spelling and punctuation and engage in 1:1 reading.

 

  • Increase in timetabled English and Maths lessons at KS3– Across all year groups we moved to 4 lessons a week for English and one lesson of ‘Literacy Boost’ and 5 lessons of Mathematics, resulting in the need for additional staffing.  The aim of this is to ensure that students receive one reading lesson a week as well as allowing a more extensive focus on core skills in year 7.

 

  • Effective teaching and learning– staff professional development sessions have focused on how to work with students that arrive in school with lower than average grades or whose reading age is below 11.  Quality first teaching has the strongest impact on pupil achievement and we believe this is critical to supporting student progress. The work scrutiny audits clearly indicate that all teachers are correcting keyword spellings, grammar and punctuation. Staff have benefited from discussion about extended writing.

 

  • Summer School Transition Programme Literacy and numeracy themed enrichment and intervention targeted at those identified as below the national standard on entry.

 

  • Saturday Academy intervention for Year 7 students targeted at those identified as below the national standard on entry.

 

Due to the large number of students who arrive at the academy who are below the national standard of 100 in Maths and English, we invest far more into literacy and numeracy than is given in the premium. The table below reflects how much was directly spent from the catch up fund.

Strategy Spend from the catch up fund vs Overall spend
Dedicated Nurture Teacher £11,001.16 +

£2543.87 +

£2733.99

= £16279.02

Accelerated Reader £200
Increase in timetabled English and Maths lessons at KS3 £1000
Effective teaching and learning £600
Summer School Transition Programme £1200
Saturday Academy intervention for Year 7 students £800
TOTAL £20079.02

 

We assess the impact of our intervention on attainment in Literacy & Numeracy through the following assessment methods:

  • Key Stage 2 Tests
  • CATs
  • Internal Baseline Assessments
  • Class Teacher Monitoring
  • Progress Tests
  • Reading and Spelling Age Tests

 Impact and Outcomes of Student Progress (2016-17)

Starting points

In reading, 53.8% of students (78) were below the national standard of 100 points.

In mathematics, 53.8% (78) were below the national standard of 100 points.

There are 18 students who came in below 90 in reading and 8 in Mathematics.

End of year

Students’ reading ages were tracked throughout the year.  When looking at progress, on average students have made 3 years, 5 months improvement.

2017-18

Overview of the school and funding 2017-18

This year we will receive the same overall amount of year 7 catch-up premium funding we received in 2016 to 2017, adjusted to reflect the percentage change in the size of our year 7 cohort, based on the October 2017 census. Unfortunately this will not reflect the increase in the number of students who have entered the academy below the national standard. However the academy is committed to ensuring that all pupils catch up and excel here, regardless of starting points and we have already committed more funding to this area.

Total number of year 7 students on roll  165
Percentage change in cohort  7.8%
Total amount of funding expected to be received  £18,869

 

Starting Points

This information does not include students for whom there is no data, for example students moving from another country.

Strategies to be employed this year:

  • Dedicated Nurture Teacher (including dedicated nurture room) – the school will continue to employ a dedicated nurture teacher to teach those students most in need of catch-up in literacy and numeracy in Yr 7 (and in Yr8). Students in this nurture set are taught in the same environment by the nurture teacher for all their English and Mathematics lessons (10/25), easing transition from primary to secondary.

 

  • Appointment of a Director of Literacy – This leadership position for Literacy that was created last year will continue. Their remit is to ensure high standards of literacy across the curriculum, that students make more than expected progress with their reading ages and that all students who are in need of catch up get the necessary support and intervention.

 

  • Accelerated Reader– The school will continue to use the Accelerated Reader programme to support the assessment and improvement of students’ reading age supporting their basic literacy skills. The library will continually be stocked to ensure there is engaging material for our weakest readers to allow them to start accessing the scheme.

 

  • Small group literacy intervention group and 1:1 reading– Small groups or individual students will continue to be withdrawn from lessons to work on basic English skills with our English HLTA or TA, these groups focus particularly on writing skills such as spelling and punctuation and engage in 1:1 reading.

 

  • Effective teaching and learning– Specific training days to promote literacy and numeracy across all subject areas with departmental representatives appointed in both areas have been built into the CPD programme. The Director of Literacy has already developed a Literacy Across the Curriculum group to develop and share outstanding practice.

 

  • Saturday Academy intervention for Year 7 students targeted at those identified who are still below progress in the Spring Term.

 

  • Summer school intervention programme for those students who have not met the required level by the end of the July 2018.

 

  • Curriculum review– we have undertaken a comprehensive curriculum review to ensure pupils are supported in making progress to achieve their potential.  This had led to a variety of decisions such as the decision to move to a mathematics mastery curriculum and a new Problem Solving lesson and a more challenging KS3 curriculum in English to reflect the additional rigour of testing at KS2 and KS4.